The Game of Thrones lesson three: When people rejoice at burrial!


Have you ever wondered why people might celebrate the death of somebody? And do you think it is entirely devilish to feel a kind of joy and relief when someone dies or meets a calamity? By the way, do you remember the celebrations of Israelites at the death of Goliath? How about the woman who was raised by St. Peter simply because she had made a lot of clothing for people while still alive? Anyway, it is possible that people can rejoice and celebrate the death of their king, leader, manager, parent or you. And it is possible that people can be hurt by your death or their king and have grief. And the unusual part of this, it may as well be morally upright.
In this movie, a son of the king ( a lie, a son of the king's wife and her brother), Geofrey, takes over the throne with youthful arrogance. He takes advantage of a young innocent woman who loves him and tortures her day and night. He takes his position as a weapon to torture his uncle, the dwarf. Even during his marriage celebrations with another princess, Geofrey tortures the uncle with words and orders that almost drove the public into cry. Fortunately, someone had put poison into the King's cup of wine. In his torturous moves, the king orders the dwarf,his uncle to offer him the wine. Yes, the uncle does as ordered only to see the King die still with dirty words in the mouth. You say there is heaven, how can someone enter it if even his last breath had words of devil and hatred?

Oh God, we all clapped our hands. We became happy. We thanked God and tossed our drinks. And if you asked why, it was because the king was dying and a terrible choking death. And you think the gods were unhappy with us? I suppose No for they provided the timely death so we may get relieved and we did. Yeah, the people and guards put on a scary face and hurried the king to the resting but it was not out of love, it was out of duty, the same we practice when a village murderer or a dangerous leader has died.

You see, what we do for others when we are still alive means a lot when we die. It should be everyone's goal to leave a good name behind and tears of grief when he dies than people rejoicing and celebrating your death. So do not think that it is a sin for people to celebrate your misseries or even cause you some, it depends on who you are to them as well. I am sure you know the phrase that revenge is for God but that won't stop people from returning you the favors that you give. And by the way, who told you that when people pay you back are revenging? No, they are just showing you the signs of the divine revenge you will experience.

Listen, there is no need of people celebrating your death or collapse, start behaving well too. I know there are those who celebrate our death or collapse simply because they are jealous or do not like us but surely we also need to do well to others so that they miss us when we die. So did you feel a kind of joy when the murderer of your mother died? Did you praise God when the police arrested those who robbed you? Did you feel happy because the one who taped your sister was shot yesterday while rapping another woman? It is okay if you did. At least, it is what God expected from you and you did it.

Finally, it is possible that people can celebrate or even work for the collapse or death of their king, leader, manager, dad or mother, it is how you lived your life and how bad or good you were to them. So i am seeing so many of us using our offices, our positions, and our talents to exploit the public. We are eating bread and cakes from the blood of innocent ones and the needy, we are building riches and getting higher in leadership at the expense of the needy and marginalised and we expect the nation to cry or mourn our death? Oh no, change. Let us change.

The Complete You Project.

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